How to Organise a Biennial in the Covid Era | The Art Newspaper

02
September 2020
·
min read

Apinan Poshyananda, the chief executive and artistic director of Bangkok Art Biennale, is feeling confident about launching the Bangkok Art Biennale next month in the wake of the Covid-19 crisis. “Thailand has been coronavirus-free now for 100 days,” he says. The second edition is due to include more than 200 works under the theme of Escape Routes by artists such as Leandro Erlich, Yoko Ono and Marina Abramovic.

“It was quite chaotic in 2018 when the biennial ran in 20 venues; this year, it will be reduced to nine venues,“ he says. This time, the first three spaces are due to open on 12 October (until 31 January), including a purpose-built exhibition space of over 1,000 sq. m at The Parq, with the six remaining venues launching on 29 October, including three Buddhist temples and Museum Siam.

“This is a new ball game; we have to comply with government rules. There are many constraints for foreign visitors but we are looking to local tourists. People here are bored; they want to see events. In this new life, you do not have to measure according to quantity,” says Poshyananda.

Read More

Apinan Poshyananda, the chief executive and artistic director of Bangkok Art Biennale, is feeling confident about launching the Bangkok Art Biennale next month in the wake of the Covid-19 crisis. “Thailand has been coronavirus-free now for 100 days,” he says. The second edition is due to include more than 200 works under the theme of Escape Routes by artists such as Leandro Erlich, Yoko Ono and Marina Abramovic.

“It was quite chaotic in 2018 when the biennial ran in 20 venues; this year, it will be reduced to nine venues,“ he says. This time, the first three spaces are due to open on 12 October (until 31 January), including a purpose-built exhibition space of over 1,000 sq. m at The Parq, with the six remaining venues launching on 29 October, including three Buddhist temples and Museum Siam.

“This is a new ball game; we have to comply with government rules. There are many constraints for foreign visitors but we are looking to local tourists. People here are bored; they want to see events. In this new life, you do not have to measure according to quantity,” says Poshyananda.

Read More